Run For Your Life

Depending on your sport you may or may not have dedicated time to your running technique. Even if your goals are focused on lifting heavy, knowing the proper way to run is beneficial and can be incorporated into any training routine. Adjusting the volumes and time domains around running is up to you and your coach but learning this skill is essential.

As humans our bodies have developed both the anatomy and energy systems to make us highly capable runners. It can be a great way to break up your training, provides you a chance to get into nature, and can be a great form of meditation.

“Most people run a race to see who is fastest. I run a race to see who has the most guts.” – Steve Prefontaine

Running and Genetics
In the early evolution of humans we developed several characteristics that lead us to be exceptional long distance runners. The muscles of the legs and glutes grew stronger, our feet got bigger, our ability to cool down via sweating improved, and our brains improved at maintaining homeostasis during rigorous endurance activities. This allowed us to become “persistence hunters,” tracking animals for long distances until they were too worn out to put up a fight.

Recreational Running
Fast forward to today. Long distance running and other feats of endurance are primarily recreational as we rarely need to hunt in order to eat. Running now optional, it has become a skill that some use and others lose. Running however, is part of what makes us human. It can only be assumed that having evolved and adapted as runners to optimize our physical health, running would play an important role.

Mental Health Benefits
Not only does running keep our body healthy but it also stimulates brain growth and function as well. Findings at the University of Liverpool found that “Aerobic exercise increases anterior hippocampus size. This expansion is linked to the improvement of memory, which reflects the improvement of learning as a function of running activity in animal studies.” Aerobic activity like running actually helps our brain improve function. Not only that but it can be a great way to sort out thoughts and clear your head when you’re feeling stressed or overwhelmed. Plus the release of endorphins provides an instant mood boost!

If you care about squatting, nutrition, and mobility but can’t remember the last time you ran more than a mile it might be time to lace up. If you have questions or you are not sure where to start, talk to one of our trainers that can teach you the proper mechanics for running, sprinting, and other essential skills.

Why Carbohydrates are Important As an Athlete

Nutrition is one of the most important components of training for performance. The largely held belief that sugar and carbohydrates are bad for athletes has been debunked!

Many studies show that carbohydrates are one of the best ways for an athlete to replenish glycogen stores in the muscles.If an athlete doesn’t have enough glycogen stored in the muscle, power output is directly affected. Without enough glycogen, the muscle becomes fatigued.

So how do you ensure you’ve got enough glycogen stored up in your cells for optimal energy output? Eat carbohydrates and at the right times.

When carbohydrates are consumed in healthy individuals, insulin, a hormone that controls blood sugar levels, is released in order to get glucose out of the blood and into the cells. Once this process takes place, glucose is stored as glycogen. That tired feeling after you workout is a signal to your body that blood sugar levels have dipped. This is a perfect time to utilize post workout fuel.

You can replenish your glycogen stores by consuming more carbohydrates after you workout, causing your body to release insulin and bring your blood sugar levels back down. This will simultaneously trigger glucose to be stored as glycogen in the cells. Since the cells that are fatigued and depleted are your muscle cells, storage will happen in your muscles instead of your liver. As an added bonus to hypertrophy, the next time you go to use your muscles they’ll be contracting at full energy capacity.

In certain circumstances, for example if an athlete has diabetes, consuming these types of carbohydrates won’t have the desired effect. If an athlete is not insulin sensitive or has diabetes, spikes in blood sugar levels will stay elevated after eating carbohydrates. This can result in elevated LDL or bad cholesterol and high blood pressure. A diabetic body simply can’t handle the sugars and isn’t releasing insulin in order to store it into the cells. There is a solution to the exception. As a diabetic, you would work directly with a medical professional and be prescribed insulin since the body is not producing it on its own.

You may be wondering how you can increase your insulin sensitivity to optimize your response to elevated blood sugar levels and maximize your muscle growth and global energy. There are a few key factors to consider around your workout that will help.

It’s important to tend to your overall health. The more stressed your body, the harder normal daily functions and internal reactions will be. We are aiming for optimal here. Make sure you’re doing the following to keep your blood sugar levels in check:

  1. Sleep
    We all know how important sleep is. It can impact every function in the body, especially the release of insulin. Aim for 8 hours a night of good quality sleep. Try sleeping with a sleep mask to eliminate any extra light in the room or a hot tea before bed to wind down.
  2. Exercise
    This is one of the most important components for staving off disease. Aim for at least 30 minutes a day. Studies have shown that this is an excellent way to decrease your risk of developing insulin resistance and diabetes along with a plethora of other diseases!
  3. Eat a Balanced and Healthy Diet
    Aim for a variety of fruits and vegetables on a daily basis. Eat healthy fats, like omega-3 found in fish and seeds, avocados, and nuts. Avoid saturated fats when possible and drink plenty of water.

The big takeaway here is that carbohydrates are friends and food! Get in touch with someone who can help you navigate the waters of carbohydrate timing around workouts if you’re looking to improve your power output and physique.

How Athletes Win The Day

If you’re training a lot, chances are it feels like life is a bit chaotic. You may feel like you don’t have enough time for most things in life. While you’re definitely busy getting better at the gym or on the field or court, you may be missing out on some key routines that could change the way you feel about your day.

“The first hour of the morning is the rudder of the day.” -Henry Ward Beecher

Healthy Breakfast 

Having a routine to start your morning is just like having a pregame ritual or a set up ritual before you attempt an olympic lift. Starting your morning off with consistency will help you stay more focused throughout the day and improve your mental attitude which we know is important for athletic performance. A great beverage for the morning is hot water with lemon and a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar and cinnamon. 

Stretching or Movement Practice

Getting blood flow allows for a smooth transition into your morning. Bringing awareness to your body will allow you to address any issues that may be surfacing before you get to the weight room. Mobilitywod.com has some great videos on how to stretch and release some of your most pressing aches and pains. Deep belly breathing is highly encouraged during this part of your morning routine.

Review your goals and visualize your ultimate success

You’re training for something right? Visualizing yourself every morning accomplishing your goal is one of the most powerful things you can do for your training. You create important neural connections and your mind and body become aligned to opportunities that will encourage the realization of your goals.

Take a look at your schedule and be one step ahead of it

Being late to train or practice is never a good feeling. Missing appointments and meetings at work or home can cause undue stress to your situation too. By confronting your schedule head-on in the morning, you’re committing to integrity which translates directly to your training habits.

There you have it, a great way for any athlete to start the day! Click HERE to speak to a coach!

4 Ways to Eat Better Without Going On a Diet

In 2016, author Derek Sivers wrote a series of blog posts that centered around directives to live by. One particular post titled “How to thrive in an unknowable future” rings true now more than ever. Let’s take a look at the 6 guidelines Derek recommends and expand on ways you could apply them today! The 6 guidelines are:

Prepare for the worst
Expect Disaster
Own as little as possible
Choose opportunity, not loyalty
Choose the plan with the most options
Avoid planning

1. Prepare for the worst.
“Since you have no idea what the future may bring, be open to the best and the worst.”
The best-case scenario takes care of itself. If you get promoted and handed a bonus check or the love of your life walks up to you and asks you on a date then that doesn’t require much more than a handshake and celebration.

Preparing for the worst, on the other hand, is a more difficult exercise, but far more pragmatic and beneficial. A lot of us are on the fence right now as we face challenges in our careers, living situations, and in our relationships. We’re waiting for things to blow over, get better, or sort themselves out. We say we can hang on a little bit longer and it’ll all be fine. Start taking action towards the worst-case scenario and mitigate the risk of that happening as much as possible.

2. Expect disaster.
“Not just money, but health, family, freedom. Expect it all to disappear.”
In line with preparing for the worst is to expect disaster. Most of us don’t like to think about a major disaster happening. It can feel morbid and be a bit of a downer after all.

However, It can also give us great insight into the things we are most afraid of. Sometimes a little bit of fear can be a healthy motivator if it drives us to take action towards preventing the thing that we don’t want. If you tend to procrastinate doing certain activities that you know would benefit you then maybe having that worst-case scenario in mind is exactly what you need.

Don’t wait to clean up your diet and begin to exercise. Don’t wait to invest in your 401k just because it’s only a few dollars each month. The initial embarrassment you may feel while starting is a worthwhile tradeoff for the future benefit of taking action today.

3. Own as little as possible.
“The less you own, the less you’re affected by a disaster.”
Own as little as possible. This can seem trite and an easy guideline to shrug away from. After all, what about the American dream? Owning things doesn’t make you a bad person and your stuff makes you happy right?

Owning as little as possible can help you acknowledge what is important to you. In the context of thriving in an unknowable future, it will reduce decision fatigue and optimize your flexibility in decision making.

Elon Musk recently decided to sell his houses and take on a more minimal approach to life. As a billionaire who could retire today this decision was clearly not financial. Elon knows that we have a finite amount of time on this planet. The tradeoff of time and energy he could make building and maintaining his dream houses would be better spent on one of his companies and family. He knows what is important to him so he can put down a good opportunity for a great one that will have a bigger impact on humanity.

4. Choose opportunity, not loyalty.
“Have no loyalty to location, corporation, or your past public statements…have loyalty for only your most important human relationships.”

The concept of loyalty varies in importance to many people. The fear of guilt and shame for making a choice that you know will be beneficial to you can be a hard pill to swallow. Some of us spend years in roles that might not be our best option because we value loyalty so highly. When you don’t know what the future brings it’s important to consider what opportunity in front of you presents the best option even if it means a change.

5. Choose the plan with the most options.
“The best plan is the one that lets you change your plans.”

In the world, we live in being able to work independent of a physical location, having a flexible schedule, or the ability to change the projects that you work on have proven to be important factors. Many of us have had to pivot and change the way we operate and will most likely approach our careers with fresh eyes.

The same concept should apply to your health and fitness routine. With the right coaching, you can maintain your strength through a functional fitness routine using minimal equipment or even bodyweight movements. If you have traditionally relied on a ton of equipment or loud music and flashing lights to get your workout in it has probably been a bit of an adjustment. Consider trying a new approach to your training that offers you more flexibility and resilience.

6. Avoid planning.
“Since you have no idea how the situation or your mood may change in the future, wait until the last moment to make each decision.”

Avoid planning. Not advice that you often hear but when you don’t know what the future could bring it kind of makes sense. Many people who have had their heart set on a vacation or planning an important family gathering or wedding ceremony have struggled with how to best adjust or manipulate their plans. If you are unsure of what the future might bring it can help to let go of expectations and hold off on the planning.

The Beginners Guide to Stability Training

Stability training is an important and often overlooked element of training. Whether it’s your first day in the gym or you are a veteran athlete you can benefit from stability training. Our bodies are forced to accommodate the demands of sport and life. To prevent falling, maintain balance, and moving our bodies and external objects through space requires stability and motor control over our muscles and joints. Improving one’s ability to stabilize is an essential skill in life!

So how do you get started at training this essential skill? Let’s answer some of the common questions around what stability training so you can start training it today.

One. What is stability training?

Two. How Should I incorporate stability training into my workout?

Three. What does stability exercise look like?


One. What is stability training?
Stability training can be defined as maintaining control or a joint movement or body position by coordinating actions of the surrounding muscles and central nervous system. It can be achieved using bodyweight movements or through some form of resistance training such as with free weights. When most people think of stability training they think of someone balancing on a Bosu ball or foam pad waving their arms around trying to maintain balance.

Stability training doesn’t actually require any special equipment and for most people, it’s actually totally unnecessary. In fact, all that training on an unstable surface does is limit the ability to add intensity or load to train the working muscle groups.

Which brings us to question number two.

Two. How Should I incorporate stability training into my workout?
The most effective way to incorporate stability training into your training is actually through strength training on stable surfaces. Through resistance training with free weights and bodyweight movements you can improve the strength and endurance of the most commonly underworked stabilizers and core muscles. Training unilateral (1 arm or 1 leg) movements will ensure that you minimize any imbalances that may occur with a typical barbell or machine training.

Focus on balancing in different positions as you move your own bodyweight through space is a great way to assess your athleticism and identify areas for improvement.

Three. What does stability exercise look like?
Stability exercises could include movements like single-leg deadlifts and lunges and will help strengthen the muscles that stabilize the knee joint. Using dumbbells or kettlebells for movements like bent-over rows or pressing movements will help improve stability and proprioception. Using basic jumping and plyometric exercises with a focus on “sticking” the landing position is also a great way to improve balance and stability.

Stability training can help us all enjoy a better quality of life. From playing with our kids to playing recreational or competitive sports it can improve performance and reduce the risk of injury.

If you’re looking for a training routine that works for you get in touch with one of our coaches today!

3 Areas That Are Essential To Mobilize

“It’s not enough to exercise,“You have got to sleep. You have got to drink enough water. You have got to develop a practice around maintenance of your body. You have got to learn how to move right.” -Kelly Starrett

Let’s face it, there are times when movement prep and cool-down take a back seat to the actual workout. You might be guilty of jumping right into your main lift of the day because you’re short on time. Maybe your post workout cool-down consists of some gasping and sweat angels on the floor before lumbering to the parking lot in search of your protein shake?

Yes, you can make an argument about how kids don’t stretch before taking off at the playground, but with a few rare exceptions all of us need to make time for mobility if we are training hard. Mobility is equal parts injury prevention and performance benefit. If you want to perform at your maximum capability it is well worth the investment of time. I’ll give you a hint, it doesn’t take much! Let’s look at 3 major areas that can make a huge difference in mobility.

1.Ankles
2.Psoas
3.Thoracic spine

1.Ankles
Tight ankles can be a major impediment in your daily training. If you feel like you are hitting a wall in your lifts and want to improve your squats, deadlifts, cleans, and snatches you may want to give some serious attention to your ankles.

Our musculoskeletal system generates movement through the contraction of muscles on a series of levers, our bones. Some positions are more advantageous than others and our goal as athletes is to take advantage of these positions to generate more power in our lifts.

Shortened range of motion in the ankle will make it difficult to maintain powerful positions in the squat because to achieve depth the body must borrow additional range of motion. This compensation is often shown by the individual turning their feet out to the sides. This is often a less favorable position for our muscles to produce optimal force from and can increase risk of injury.

To prep the ankles and increase range of motion practice sitting in the bottom position of a pistol (1-legged) squat. A pistol squat forces the ankle of the working leg to dorsiflex, or shorten the angle created at the ankle joint.

2.Psoas
The psoas is a tricky muscle that often slips under the radar. It runs from the head of the femur in the hip socket and travels up attaching to the lumbar spine. If the psoas tightens it reduces range of motion in the hip socket and simultaneously pulls the lumbar spine down and in. This usually shows up as pain in the low back.

Mobilize the psoas by exploring positions of hip extension. Think about the backswing of the leg before you kick a ball. This means creating space with movements like the couch stretch. Your low back will thank you.

3.Thoracic Spine
The thoracic spine or t-spine for short refers to the series of vertebrae the length of your rib cage, from the neck down to mid spine. As you can imagine, this area is profoundly impacted by the activities we perform and the positions we keep it in. Sedentary behavior and poor posture will cause the thoracic region to become immobile and lose its ability to flex and extend. This becomes problematic and dangerous especially when overhead movements are involved.

Just like with our ankles, a lack of mobility causes our body to compensate and search for movement in alternative areas when hitting an end range of motion. This means losing stability in order to allow for additional mobility. When the thoracic spine is tight our body finds extra space in the lumbar spine and/or scapula region. Chronic injuries and inflammation tend to spring up in these areas if we continually force this movement during exercises like the overhead press or kipping on the pull-up bar.

These are just 3 areas where mobility can make a huge difference in your performance and your health. If you want to learn more about ways to improve your mobility stop in to speak with one of our coaches today.

8 Delicious and Functional Fall Foods

With Halloween right around the corner and Thanksgiving and Christmas following close behind it’s a great time to start thinking about the change of the season. The last 3 months of the year present a great time to come together with friends and loved ones. The pinnacle of these gatherings is often the food and treats that are shared.

For some folks, the buffet of rich foods and desserts can be a real challenge. Know that it’s okay to indulge in some of your favorite treats. Just focus on filling up with delicious foods that also have health benefits first and staying active. Let’s fork up 8 Delicious and Functional Fall Foods that you should focus on eating!

Turkey
Pumpkin
Squash
Apples
Cranberries
Pecans
Brussel Sprouts
Beets

Turkey
Turkey is a very rich source of protein, niacin, vitamin B6 and the amino acid tryptophan. It also contains zinc, selenium, and vitamin B12. The skinless white meat of turkey is low on fat and is an excellent source of protein. Don’t be afraid to double down on turkey if you’re missing out on other healthy options at the table.

Pumpkin
Pumpkin is rich in potassium and vitamins A, C, and E. A serving of pumpkin also contains more than 20% of your daily recommended intake of fiber. This fun fall food can be prepared in a variety of ways so try to keep this dish simple and not too sweet by doctoring it up with freshly ground cinnamon and a little sea salt. And no, a pumpkin spice latte does not count!

Squash
Squash a tremendous source of beta carotene, manganese, and antioxidants like vitamin C. It’s also a great source of potassium that is associated with lowering blood pressure. A roasted acorn squash with a little grass fed butter and some lean protein can be a simple and delicious harvest dinner!

Apples
Apples are a fan favorite when it comes to fall foods and a fun fall activity. They are a great source of Vitamin K, potassium and immune-boosting Vitamin C. “You also get plenty of dietary fiber (pectin) from this delicious fruit that can help you feel satiated. Eat this fruit whole, add it to a salad, or make it the foundation of a healthy dessert. Bonus points if you pick your own!

Cranberries
Cranberries are a fall superfood high in vitamins, fiber, minerals and antioxidants. They are also correlated with reducing the incidence of urinary tract infection and contain immune boosting properties to boot! Rather than buying pre packaged cranberry sauce try making your own with fresh squeezed orange juice for a healthier alternative.

Pecans
Pecans are a great source of Vitamin E (which is both immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory) as well as B-vitamins and magnesium which are essential for a healthy heart and muscle function. A handful of pecans make a great snack but some pecan themed desserts can be loaded with sugar so proceed with caution.

Brussel Sprouts
Brussel sprouts are a cruciferous vegetable that contain potassium, iron, and heart-protective B vitamins—including B6 and thiamin. Brussel sprouts also contain prebiotic which feed the healthy bacteria in your gut. You can’t get enough of this crispy crunchy veggie!

Beets
Beets are a go-to fall food when it comes to fiber, iron, potassium and folic acids. This superfood can be prepared in a variety of ways from roasted beets and beet chips to a nice cold glass of beet juice to help you detox.

There you have it. 8 delicious and functional fall foods that you should aim to incorporate into your diet this season. Have more questions on how to get in the groove with healthy dietary choices this fall? Click HERE to get in touch with one of our coaches and we’d be happy to help!

The Top 3 Hacks For Healthy Eating

Not every “fit” person follows a diet.

Not every person who struggles with their body composition lacks self control.

Finding the right foods, ratios, and quantities to optimize the way you look and feel is an ever evolving process. Your body is in a constant state of change. Cells are dying and regenerating. The body we live in today is a result of many past choices. How we look and feel will be influenced by our food choices, age, gender, hormones, activities, sleep, and stress. There’s no one right answer.

There are however some areas we can focus on in our journey to looking and feeling great. Here are the top 3 hacks for healthy eating!

  1. Pick your fats
  2. Eat more vegetables
  3. Protein is the foundation of every meal

1. Pick your fats
Fats stick with you. Not just figuratively, they actually make up the cell wall in every cell in your body. This affects the way cells communicate with one another as well as your body’s inflammatory response. That’s why the types and the quality of fats you choose to eat is such an important factor.

Fat Types
Polyunsaturated fats and monounsaturated fats can help provide your body with a sustainable energy source, decrease inflammation, and improve mental performance. These types of fats are found in foods such as salmon, vegetable oils, nuts and seeds.

Saturated fats should be consumed sparingly. They are not all bad but high consumption of saturated fat may be linked to increased risk of heart disease.

Fat Quality
Each meal should include a healthy fat option that supports your goals. Fat quality in animal products can vary greatly depending on the conditions the animal was raised in and what they were. You are eating what the animal ate! Focus on humanely raised animal products, grass finished, and wild fish versus farm raised.

Fat amounts
Working with an experienced nutritionist is a great way to calculate your fat needs for the day. This can vary based on your body type, genetics, and goals. Try to avoid high fat meals before or after exercise to avoid any digestive issues around training.

2. Eat more vegetables
Seems like a no-brainer but when you think about your meals over the past few days how many of those contained a full serving of veggies?

Vegetables are a great source of fiber, essential nutrients, and prebiotics to support gut health. They are also always going to be your best alternative when it comes to snacking. Most of us are not going to do any sort of damage by stuffing our face with broccoli and carrots!

3. Protein is the foundation of every meal

Humans need protein. There’s no way around it. The amino acids that make up proteins (plant or animal) are the building blocks for our muscles. Without sufficient protein in the diet our bodies will start breaking down muscle, diverting amino acids to perform other critical functions in the body.

So how much do you need? This again will vary a ton based on your goals, body composition, and genetics. Once you have your protein goal determined for the day. Set a protein goal for each meal by dividing that total daily amount by the number of meals you generally eat. Don’t forget to factor in your post workout shake!

For example, if you are shooting to consume 150 grams of protein per day and typically eat 5 times a day you would aim for about 30 grams of protein at each meal. Once you figure out your numbers it becomes easy to know what foods support that quantity of protein.

There you have it, the top 3 hacks for healthy eating! If you’re trying to clean up your nutrition and fitness regiment click HERE let us know how we can best help!

Finding YOUR Workout of the Day

Most basketball players always end their practice by making a shot. Some great players will even commit to making 10 shots in a row before hitting the showers. This helps them develop a winning mindset and lets them leave on a good note.

Oftentimes when it comes to fitness however we take the opposite approach. We either grind ourselves into a fine powder. Doing more and more until we leave exhausted. Or on the other end of the spectrum…leave feeling like we didn’t accomplish that much and had more in the tank.

Finding the right balance of volume and intensity is an ongoing battle. Sleep, nutrition, and a whole host of other factors affecting recovery must be taken into consideration. A workout that crushes you on one day may feel like a walk in the park on another.

Many folks are now utilizing devices like Whoop or an Oura Ring to track their “daily readiness” for training. Any information and tangible data is great feedback from your body but then you have to know how to use it. Your best option is always going to be working with a coach who has experience training athletes with a similar training age and goals as you have. They might even know better than you what your body is capable of. They will also know the right scales and adjustments to make on the fly to make sure you are getting the most out of your training.

“At the center of your being
you have the answer;
you know who you are
and you know what you want.”
― Lao Tzu

So how do you leave the gym with confidence in your performance? Make sure that every action you take aligns with your goals. If you know you’ll feel better by cranking up the intensity then end your session with a quick sprint on the air bike or rower. Choose modalities that won’t beat up your body or take away from the next day’s training session. If the workout is kicking your butt and you will feel guilty if you don’t finish it then see what scales or adjustments you can make that will make you better without crushing you. Back off the weight to focus on a slow controlled tempo with perfect form.

If you need help getting the most out of your training, contact one of our coaches to see what recommendations they have!

WHAT TO PUT ON YOUR PLATE TO BUILD MUSCLE

 

 

EATING TO BUILD MUSCLE

If you’ve missed the previous write-up s in this series, you can catch it here:

Now that we’ve covered why muscle matters and how to approach your training to build and maintain muscle, it’s time we pivot to the other half of the muscle-building equation: Nutrition.

Let’s get into it!

 

PROTEIN … DUH!

This might seem obvious, but when it comes to nutrition advice for building and maintaining muscle, protein is key.

We’ve all heard this before, but protein is the building block for lean muscle mass. Simply put, if you’re not getting enough protein in your diet, you aren’t going to build muscle.

The problem is that a lot of people still aren’t getting enough protein in their diets, meaning they are leaving valuable gains on the table and negatively impacting their recovery.

Remember, eating enough protein and regularly doing strength training is not going to make you bulky. Even if your goal is to burn off excess body fat and change the composition of your body to look leaner, building muscle is critical.

Also keep in mind that by prioritizing protein in your diet, you’re more likely to feel satiated after your meals, which can help prevent cravings for highly palatable, calorie-dense foods — that’s important if your primary goal is fat loss.

Which gets us into the million-dollar question: How much protein do you need in order to support ideal muscle growth?

As with most things nutrition-related, it depends. But generally speaking, 0.8–1.0 grams of protein per pound of body weight is a good bare minimum to shoot for.

So, for a 185-pound male, that would mean about 148–185 grams of protein, and for a 140-pound female, that would mean about 112–140 grams of protein. But remember, this should be looked at as more of a minimum to shoot for rather than a rigid recommendation for how much protein is actually ideal for muscle growth.

The leaner you are, the more active you are, and the longer you have been training are all factors that will increase your demand for protein beyond these numbers. For most, however, this is a good place to start.

 

ONE THING TO TRY THIS WEEK

Calculate how much protein you should be eating based on the numbers recommended above and track your food for a few days to see how close you’re getting to that goal.

Sure, tracking your food can seem intimidating or even an unnecessary step for some, but if you really want to know if you’re setting yourself up for ideal muscle growth, strength gains, and the body composition changes you want to see, you need to know if you’re coming close to your daily protein needs or not. You can watch a short video on how to start tracking your food HERE

How else are you going to recover and maximize the gains you get from the new cycle on the Sentry App?

Are you ready to feed your body what it needs to make the most of it?

LET’S GO!